Thunderbird Ate My RSS

Once I got beyond reading five or six blogs, it became more or less impossible to keep up with checking them online and seeing if there were new posts; so I started subscribing to their RSS feeds using the Thunderbird mail client.  This worked fine and made it much easier to avoid missing posts.  However, today I became aware that a couple of my subscriptions had stopped functioning (sorry, Finicky Penguin and Cinema Gypsy).  The folders were still there, but they looked empty, so I thought, okay, I’ll just add the subscriptions back in.  Wrong!  Thunderbird wouldn’t let me add them because it said I was already subscribed.  I went through every single feed folder looking for the phantom feeds, but they were nowhere to be found.

Hmm.  What to do next?  I decided to try exporting all my feeds and then importing them again.  So I created the export file (under Subscribe –> Export), deleted all my feed folders, and then imported the feed file (under Subscribe –> Import).  Everything came back, except for the two missing feeds.  So I thought, okay, I deleted everything, so I should be able to add the missing feeds back in now.  Wrong!  Thunderbird still insisted I was subscribed to them, even though it hadn’t pulled in any messages from them in over two weeks and they were nowhere to be found in any of the other folders.

Mutter mutter mutter.  Okay, now what?  After briefly flirting with going back to Opera and its wonderful M2 mail & RSS client, I opened the feed export that I created earlier (it’s an OPML file, which can be edited with any text editor), deleted everything out of it except for two entries, and then proceeded to modify them to be for the two missing feeds.  Then I imported the hacked OPML file.  Eureka!  There are my missing feeds!  I dragged them back to the “Blogs” folder under RSS feeds, and here come all the posts that I missed from those two blogs.

Oh no! Information overload! I’ll pick up commenting on the new posts as they arrive …

For those who are interested, here’s the OPML file after I edited it:

<opml version=”1.0″>
<head>
<title>Thunderbird OPML Export</title>
<dateCreated>Sat, 28 Jun 2008 15:38:33 GMT</dateCreated>
</head>
<body>
<outline text=”Blogs”>
<outline title=”The Show Must Go On” text=”The Show Must Go On” type=”rss” version=”RSS” xmlUrl=”http://cinemagypsy.wordpress.com/feed/&#8221; htmlUrl=”http://cinemagypsy.wordpress.com/”/&gt;
<outline title=”Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Soda” text=”Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Soda” type=”rss” version=”RSS” xmlUrl=”http://finickypenguin.wordpress.com/feed/&#8221; htmlUrl=”http://finickypenguin.wordpress.com/feed/”/&gt;
</outline>
</body>
</opml>

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Seeing as how I like to bash Windows now and then, I thought it would only be fair for me to note a colossal security flaw in the Debian Linux distribution (which is the basis for, among other things, Ubuntu, which I use) affecting the OpenSSL encryption software program.  This isn’t a bug in OpenSSL, but rather, it’s something that a Debian programmer did to it that amounts to, shall we say, an orchiectomy.  Basically, in order to stop some code debugging/profiling tools from complaining, somebody commented out a line of code that was evidently responsible for creating entropy (pseudo-randomness) in order to generate an unguessable encryption key.  Oopsie.  As this is not a technology blog (and I am far from a cryptography expert), I won’t get into the nitty-gritty of what happened; for those who are interested and are of a technical bent, some good articles are here and here (and here, too).

You might’ve heard of SSL.  It’s what’s used to, among other things, broker secure (“https”) connections to web sites.  I’m not sure how bad I made this issue sound, but however bad you think it is, it’s actually worse.  (On the other hand, being open source software, we at least actually know what happened to it.)

And I still don’t have a virus, Google.